Fulton High readies to unveil its ‘fab’ lab

Board gets tour of new lab, district to host open house

(From left) Fulton School Board member Scott King, Director of Professional Development and School/Community Programs Karen Snethen and board members Dennis Depping, Kristi Donohue and Rob Hunter get a closer look at the 3-D printers in the high school's new fabrication lab. District leaders and staff received a tour of the lab — which still is a work in progress — after Wednesday night's board meeting. There will be an open house held for the community once the lab is completed.

(From left) Fulton School Board member Scott King, Director of Professional Development and School/Community Programs Karen Snethen and board members Dennis Depping, Kristi Donohue and Rob Hunter get a closer look at the 3-D printers in the high school's new fabrication lab. District leaders and staff received a tour of the lab — which still is a work in progress — after Wednesday night's board meeting. There will be an open house held for the community once the lab is completed.

In a recently remodeled classroom at Fulton High School Wednesday night, a group of fascinated adults gathered around a work bench, oohing and aahing over a small machine as it slowly, but surely worked at printing a 3-D model.

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Fulton High School science and engineering teacher Jim Hall (center) answers questions from board members Dennis Depping (left) and Rodney Latty (right) during a tour of the school’s new fabrication lab Wednesday night. The lab was made possible after the school secured a $250,000 grant from MOREnet.

The Fulton School Board and district employees got a tour of the high school’s new fabrication lab — still a work in process — after the board’s regular meeting Wednesday night.

Science and engineering teacher Jim Hall showed off all of the lab’s new toys — including two 3-D printers, a 3-D scanner and a vinyl cutter in the “clean room” and a CNC (computer numerically controlled) router and still-in-the-box laser cutter in the working lab.

Hall shared a number of pieces already created by students — including a hooded sweatshirt one student made for him with Hall’s name and the hornet logo. He showed off how students had come up with a solution to tape a file folder to the side of one of the 3-D printers because the breeze caused by the open door was warping the plastic as the printer worked up models. He showed off a couple of wooden ramps built for use by the physics classes.

Hall proudly pointed out that learning to use equipment like the CNC router will have real-world benefits for Fulton students.

“Today in the paper there was an ad for a CNC operator,” Hall said in the middle of explaining to the board how the machine can be used to cut aluminum to build robots for the robotics team. “I can guarantee our kids will have a lot better head start.”

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