Speaker tells DAR history of art, culture preservation

Historian and Missourinet news editor Bob Priddy addresses the Daughters of the American Revolution Saturday at the Fulton Country Club. Priddy talked about the DAR's involvement in the past with the state capital building in Jefferson City.

Historian and Missourinet news editor Bob Priddy addresses the Daughters of the American Revolution Saturday at the Fulton Country Club. Priddy talked about the DAR's involvement in the past with the state capital building in Jefferson City. Photo by Dean Asher.

The Daughters of the American Revolution are traditionally considered promoters of patriotism and history, but the Charity Stille Langstaff chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution received a history lesson Saturday on the importance the group has held for art and culture in Missouri.

Missourinet news director and historian Bob Priddy spoke to the DAR before their meeting at the Fulton Country Club on their history with art and the capitol building in Jefferson City, as well as what they can do to continue to preserve it.

Priddy opened up by informing the room of chapter members and guests that the DAR historically held influence in Missouri even during a time that women had few rights.

“DAR was at one time an organization that had quite a bit of political clout in the state of Missouri... it seems that a lot of prominent men in Missouri were married to prominent members of the DAR. The men who might have only been the ones who could vote or participate in government were certainly influenced by the women at home.”

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