Breaking:Missouri official reviews price gouging; case growth slows
Today's Edition News Sports Obits Weather Events Contests Classifieds Autos Jobs Search
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
story.lead_photo.caption Cavaliers teammates Kevin Love and Matthew Dellavedova celebrate after Love made a 3-point shot in overtime of a March 8 game against the Spurs in Cleveland. Photo by Associated Press / Fulton Sun.
For more news about the COVID-19 coronavirus, access the News Tribune Health section

Cleveland's Kevin Love did his best to reassure a skittish and scared public. Denver's Jamal Murray sat at his piano and played theme songs. Atlanta's Trae Young shot balled-up socks into a trash can. Miami's Goran Dragic, in his native Slovenian, told people to stay inside.

This is the new NBA normal in a coronavirus-dominated world.

Even without games, the league is trying to engage and even encourage fans in these tough times.

So far, almost 20 current and former players have partnered with the NBA and WNBA for a new sort of public-service announcement as the world continues dealing with the coronavirus pandemic that is known to have struck about a quarter-million people worldwide, killed nearly 10,000 and has essentially shut down sports around the globe.

"We're able to reach a number probably in the hundreds of millions, but as far as kids go, tens of millions of kids just by pressing send on an NBA PSA," Love said. "So for me, it was considering that community aspect as well as, you know, thinking of young kids now being at home being homeschooled, at-risk youth being homeschooled we have to reach them."

Love's PSA, released earlier this week, went for nearly three minutes and was a continuation of sorts of the conversation he's been having publicly for some time about mental health. "Now more than ever, we have to practice compassion. We need more of that," Love said in his video.

Love went public two years ago about his struggles with depression and was one of the first NBA players to announce a donation to help arena employees who aren't at work right now because of the shutdown. He gave $100,000 and has been raising money through his Kevin Love Fund to directly donate to mental health organizations working with high-risk children and teens who need help with their mental well-being.

Love didn't hesitate before deciding whether to talk directly to fans.

"This is just incredibly anxiety-ridden, stressful, and I think the unknown is what really scares us," Love said. "So, it's completely normal to feel this way and what people are feeling is normal. And I think that just being isolated at your home, it's tough to stay away from this 24-hour news cycle where all people are getting are things that will send them down a slippery slope and in a spiral because it just seems to be so negative."

The league started these PSAs on March 13, two days after the NBA's shutdown because of the virus went into effect. In less than a week across all platforms — NBA.com, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Tik Tok — the videos collected more than 36 million views, or reaching, on average, 70 people every second.

"Just a reminder to make sure you guys wash your hands, avoid large crowds and if you might be sick, quarantine yourself," Portland guard Damian Lillard said in his PSA. "This is only a virus that we can beat together."

Toronto coach Nick Nurse was one of many who spoke about the need to listen to medical professionals and wash hands frequently; the official guideline is 20 seconds, Nurse suggested raising the bar to 24 seconds in a nod to the NBA shot clock.

"This is one time we don't mind a shot clock violation," Nurse said.

COMMENTS - It looks like you're using Internet Explorer, which isn't compatible with our commenting system. You can join the discussion by using another browser, like Firefox or Google Chrome.
It looks like you're using Microsoft Edge. Our commenting system is more compatible with Firefox and Google Chrome.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT