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story.lead_photo.caption Rick Shiverdecker, left, deputy mayor in Lowe Cannell's absence Tuesday night, poses with Patrick Bonnot, of the Missouri Intergovernmental Risk Management Association. MIRMA helped the city win more than $10,000 in grants toward useful equipment. Photo by Helen Wilbers / Fulton Sun.

The City of Fulton is receiving a nice budgetary boost in the form of equipment grants from the Missouri Intergovernmental Risk Management Association.

MIRMA, the 83-member self-insurance pool in which Fulton participates, works with its members to provide risk-management services and stable insurance prices. Participating members are also eligible for MIRMA-funded matching grants.

"Congrats to the city of Fulton for again being awarded one of the (highest) amounts of all cities in the association," Patrick Bonnot, of MIRMA, said.

Most of the grants center around protection city personnel and residents. Grants being received include:

A 65 percent matching grant of $2,925 for a dash camera.

A 50 percent matching grant of $236.83 for a less-lethal shotgun and rounds.

A 50 percent matching grant of $210 for water tower fall protection.

A 50 percent matching grant of $210 for fall protection for the wastewater department.

A 50 percent matching grant of $637.50 for an AED for the electric crews.

A 50 percent matching grant of $527 for a flammable storage cabinet.

A 50 percent matching grant of $627.50 for an air quality monitor for the wastewater department.

And, finally, a 50 percent matching grant of $5,000 for a hydraulic hammer.

The grants total to $10,373.83.

City Administrator Bill Johnson thanked MIRMA for the excellent work they do for the city.

"MIRMA audits all of our departments," he said. "Imagine your car insurance provider coming around to check your tires."

Bonnot checks everything from hard hats to playground equipment. In fact, a MIRMA audit prompted the city to replace playground equipment about a decade ago after MIRMA threatened to impose a $60,000 fine. Failed audits also mean the city pays more for its insurance. Johnson joked that merely invoking Bonnot's name is enough to get city employees to fix safety issues.

"They kinda force us to be better," he said.

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