Ruth Keezer

ptbamdb 2 years, 12 months ago on Our Opinion: Striving for a practical compromise on Prop. B

The buildings were designed specifically for small dogs, for their comfort, sanitation, and ease of care. They are elevated runs with perforated flooring that allows dogs' waste to drop into a fiberglass washdown system below to be flushed away. This keeps the dogs clean, as they never track through their waste. They have water always available delivered through an automatic system. They have an outside attached run for exercise. Some are single-level (like mine); some have two levels.
These buildings will be illegal. All dogs will have to be housed in a building at ground level with an attached run (damp concrete? gravel? dirt?). The obsolete kennel cannot be retrofitted to comply with Prop B. I understand there are homeless dogs. But do you know that some shelters and rescues import dogs from other countries because they don't have enough? Rescues regularly buy dogs and puppies from auctions to sell. I see this from a different point of view. Rescues call breeders offering to take or buy any 'unwanted' dogs or puppies. You would think that there are enough homeless, stray, displaced, and unwanted dogs that the rescues and shelters wouldn't have to solicit or import.
We raise purpose-bred puppies and have a steady market. Those customers want puppies, not adult dogs. We are not taking rescue or shelters' market-share.

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ptbamdb 2 years, 12 months ago on Our Opinion: Striving for a practical compromise on Prop. B

Not much about Prop B makes sense. By changing the rules drastically, Prop B is forcing dog breeders into bankruptcy. Many breeders have industry-approved, expensive buildings (that many are still making payments on) that would instantly become obsolete and unusable the minute Prop B is in effect. That $30,000 building, not even paid for, will become totally worthless, as no one can house their dogs in that building legally anymore. Breeders have to build new buildings to specifications in Prop B. Another $40,000 or more. Will ANY bank finance a building when the breeder is still paying on the other building that is now worthless? Of course, they now have less disposable income (thanks to Prop B) to pay on the now worthless building and the new one they can't finance. Does Prop B make sense when it will cause MORE homelessness in dogs (and people)? You worry about the homeless dogs.......how about instantly having another 100,000 to worry about when Prop B hits?

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ptbamdb 3 years ago on Our Opinion: Striving for a practical compromise on Prop. B

"What we encourage is a reasonable compromise that protects humane breeders while discouraging inhumane puppy mills." That says it all. Governor Nixon's MISSOURI Solution is definitely what is needed to resolve the entire situation.
If anyone is against this compromise, you can bet that they have another agenda and their true intent is to destroy the entire dog breeding industry in Missouri, as evidenced by Prop B.

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ptbamdb 3 years, 1 month ago on Can Prop B be fixed?

And Shelley, you never have explained about the 'gaps' in current regulations. I have not found any and am anxious to hear what those 'gaps' are that Prop B fills.

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ptbamdb 3 years, 1 month ago on Can Prop B be fixed?

Response to Shelley: You are slandering legitimate dog breeders by calling them puppy mills. I and 1389 other dog breeders are offended by this and suggest you refer to LEGAL breeders without using that derogatory, inflammatory, prejudicial term. Just because HSUS labeled licensed breeders puppy mills to get Prop B passed, does NOT mean it is not a slanderous nasty term. Dogs have thrived to produce millions of healthy puppies in conditions dictated by USDA and MODA regulations in licensed Missouri kennels for years without Prop B's over-zealous over-reaching requirements.
Violations of the strict current rules certainly do not result in wholesale dog deaths, as Shelley suggests. Will it kill dogs if a lid is not replaced on a trash can, or if a fire extinguisher is missing, or if there is spilled dog food on the floor or if a dog breeder is not available for an inspection? The vast majority of violations are minor in nature and do not affect the dogs in any way. If the current rules ensure dogs survive/thrive, what is the point of Prop B? Oh, yeah. It criminalizes dog breeders and calls for jail time for minor infractions, such as a leaf, piece of gravel, or other harmless debris in a water bowl or a needed vaccination given by a breeder instead of a vet, etc.
Prop B demands pen-space the size of a bedroom for 3 tiny Chihuahuas, allows dogs unrestricted access to freezing temperatures or inclement weather (that we would protect them from without Prop B), demands temperature for nursing dogs that is too low for the survival of newborn puppies, etc. Prop B is a death-sentence for the dog breeding industry, as well as thousands of valuable breeding dogs in the one-thousand-plus kennels that will be bankrupted by Prop B.
Their expensive bank-financed USDA-approved, MODA-approved (until Prop B), veterinarian-approved kennel building will be outlawed and worthless.
There will be no market for their well-bred breeding dogs, as the market will be flooded. The illegal breeders may be buying up the best of the bunch. After all, they will thrive with the implementation of Prop B. Shelter will be begging for those dogs, but the clear-thinking breeders will NOT be giving their dogs to the very people who put them out of business. Their dogs will be humanely euthanized by their vet.

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ptbamdb 3 years, 1 month ago on Can Prop B be fixed?

Prop B is a very treacherous bill that needs changed to even be constitutional. It is remaining on the books, but has to be better worded and changed to reflect what the voters thought they were getting. It was sold to the voters as a bill to regulate or shut down bad breeders it calls puppy mills. But what it actually does is to cause an economic burden on the good licensed breeders so great that it will force nearly ALL out of business. It does NOTHING to control the illegal, unlicensed breeders as it promised to do.
It violates state constitution, property rights, and other basic rights of a group of citizens of this state.

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ptbamdb 3 years, 1 month ago on Can Prop B be fixed?

You misunderstand the entire inspection and regulation process and are quite clueless about professional kennels. Have you ever even seen one? So you think shelters and pet stores do not get violations?
50 percent of dog breeders by your calculations are not getting violations? Are they good breeders? Should they be bankrupted by Prop B if they are following current regulations? Exactly how many kennels currently have 'extremely serious' violations with no followup inspection of compliance? If you have this important information, let's see it. What exactly are the 'gaps' in the regs you keep talking about?

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ptbamdb 3 years, 1 month ago on Can Prop B be fixed?

No dog breeding = no more dogs......ever. That is the plan of HSUS. Wayne Pacelle says he doesn't want to see another dog or cat born. Prop B is just a start. HSUS will be back to further destroy what dogs are left. Are you sure that is what you want? In ten years or less, dogs would be extinct. Is HSUS going to compensate breeders for their dogs or just steal them to sell them to someone else? Or maybe they should just be killed? Why don't we just start with yours? Send the HSUS death squads around to take everyone's personal property (dogs) that are capable of breeding and have a big barbeque? Is this still America? You might want to rethink your position on the dog breeding ban. You might get really lonely in ten years without any dogs.

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ptbamdb 3 years, 1 month ago on Can Prop B be fixed?

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ptbamdb 3 years, 1 month ago on Can Prop B be fixed?

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