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story.lead_photo.caption <p>Jenny Gray/FULTON SUN</p><p>Underneath those downed branches is a house owned by Doug and Gretchen Pani, who lives off U.S. 54 between Fulton and Kingdom City. They also lost a heritage apple tree and parts of a barn.</p>

While some people huddled in their bathtubs during Tuesday evening's wild weather, power crews were already thinking about how to help their customers.

"We worked most of the night, but we had everyone back on this morning," said Clint Smith, assistant manager of Callaway Electric Cooperative. "They had a long night."

Workers were sent home to nap, but were to return to their stations to perhaps put in another long night repairing storm damage expected Wednesday evening.

National Weather Service officials sent a survey team to look at a site near Yucatan, an unincorporated area at the intersection of Route D and County Road 134 south of Prairie Fork Conservation Area. A spokeswoman said they found evidence of an EF-1 tornado, with a wind speed of about 100 miles per hour. The Fujita scale said EF-1 tornadoes typically do minor damage to roofs, gutters and siding, break tree branches, and shallow-rooted trees can be pushed over.

Much of the damage was reported on the north/northwest side of Fulton. Gretchen Pani, who owns a farm with her husband, Doug, midway between Fulton and Kingdom City, said she was on the phone with her insurance company much of Wednesday morning. Huge branches crashed into a corner of her house, pieces of her barn roof were gone or wrapped around a guy wire, and she lost a beloved 100-year-old apple tree.

"It was one of those you can't replace," she said.

Fulton city workers also were busy restoring service on

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