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Fulton candidates relate to hopes, concerns for the city

Fulton candidates relate to hopes, concerns for the city

March 16th, 2017 by Jenny Gray in Local News

Fulton City Hall

Photo by Jenny Gray /Fulton Sun.

Several candidates are running unopposed to fill seats on the Fulton City Council during the Fulton City Council during the April 4 municipal elections.

Ward 1: Wayne Chailland

I migrated to Fulton in 1985 with my wife and two sons to advance my career as the area supervisor for recruiting with the Army National Guard. After retirement, I managed a cellular phone company with Southwestern Bell, where I expanded a couple of stores to 10 stores through central and southern Missouri. I served as scout leader for Boy Scout Troop 50 and am a lifetime member of the Fulton Optimist Club. I became a pilot and my hobbies include golf and fishing. My wife and I attend Southside Baptist Church, where I sing with the men's choir.

Q. What do you think is the biggest issue the city needs to solve?
A. Fulton currently has too many buildings that are vacant. We need businesses to fill these spaces and fill the needs of citizens, so they will shop here and increase income for the city. We need to survey citizens as to what types (of businesses) they want, and then recruit those businesses.

Q. What makes you qualified for the position?
A. I have 10 years on the council and am involved with the people. My business degree and more than 25 years of leadership experience are important for this position.

Q. What is your greatest fear and your greatest hope for the future?
A. Our most qualified graduates move elsewhere to find good-paying jobs. My greatest hope is that the city continues to draw significant employment opportunities.

Ward 2: Jeff Stone

I was born and raised in Fulton. I graduated from Fulton High and my wife, Teresa, graduated from South Callaway. My wife and I raised our two children, Keegan and Emily, in Fulton and they are both currently in college. Teresa and I have been active with the schools and the community over the years. I currently work for SSM Health in Jefferson City and Mexico, but Fulton has always been my home.

Q. What do you think is the biggest issue the city needs to solve?
A. The main focus of the City Council should always be the growth and sustainment of our town. We have solid infrastructure and a good economy, we just need to keep improving on both. By focusing on providing the best roads, neighborhoods and services we possibly can in Fulton, we will attract and retain great businesses and families. Fulton has many different industries and amenities that provide excellent careers and a great lifestyle. We are also close enough to Jefferson City and Columbia to allow for expanded career opportunities and all the extras. This community has a rich history and a positive culture that people love. The Council is trusted to keep it healthy and growing, without losing that small town feel.

Q. What makes you qualified for the position?
A. I feel my main qualification is the level of my caring and commitment to the community. I'm proud to be from Fulton, and I want Fulton to be a successful community for generations. I do have college degrees, am an Air Force retiree, health care and business experience, and I have always been active with multiple community organizations and my church. So all of that helps me understand the operations and function of a city government, but I think the most important qualification is to truly care about the community that you live in.

Q. What is your greatest fear and your greatest hope for the future?
A. I don't really have any fear for Fulton. The people and resources that we have as a city are respected and stable. We just have to keep reaching and stretching our imagination to make it great. My hope is that we do just that. I want Fulton to be seen by our own citizens as a great place to live, work, and raise families. And we need to be seen by other people and businesses as a great place to settle and grow. With the right partnerships, businesses, services, and infrastructure; we can provide the best economy and hometown feel that everyone wants and needs.

Ward 3: Richard Vaughn

I was born and raised in the city of Fulton. I graduated from Fulton High School in 1966 and have lived in Fulton and the Callaway County area all of my life. I served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War in 1968. I was wounded after being there for five months and sent back to the United States. I married my wife Frances, who was also born and raised in the city of Fulton. We have two sons, five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren and expect another at any time. All our family live in Callaway County. I am proud to have served on the City Council since 2010 and look forward to my next term.

Q. What do you think is the biggest issue the city needs to solve?
A. The sewage treatment plant, and making sure it's completed on time. It's running a little behind schedule.

Q. What makes you qualified for the position?
A. I've held other positions in the local union that I belonged to. I served on the executive board six years before I was president. I've had 33 years in construction and mechanical stuff. I wanted to give all the input I could on projects the city does. The other big thing and one of the reasons I did want to run again, we've got some big issues with storm water. I want to see the parks and rec department's community building project designed and we're making headway with that.

Q. What is your greatest fear and what is your greatest hope for your community?
A. My biggest fear is that the politicians in Missouri are doing away with a lot of the tax incentives that we have used throughout the years. Lots of bills introduced do away with incentives that help the cities. They're just taking away funding revenues.
What I like most about Fulton, it's a small town and we really don't have the crime that Columbia and Jefferson City have to put up with. I wouldn't move for anything.

Ward 4: Rick Shiverdecker

Shiverdecker is a lifelong Callaway County resident, a South Callaway High School graduate and attended Lincoln University. He's been married 20 years and has one daughter and two stepsons. He is an Army veteran and worked for the state of Missouri, Department of Corrections and Fulton State Hospital for 22 years. He owns Sears Hometown Store of Fulton. He's running for his fourth term as councilman.

Q. What do you think is the biggest issue the city needs to solve?
A. The half-cent sales tax created for storm water and parks and recreation has probably solved that. Now it's just a matter of getting it done. The work force is an issue right now and something we can work on. We want to bring in more industry, but if we did where would we get the 400 to 500 employees?

Q. What makes you qualified for the position?
A. I've been doing City Council now for three terms and this will be my fourth term. I think the council we have now seems to be running smoothly.

Q. What is your greatest fear and what is your greatest hope?
A. My greatest fear is that after all the work and money we're spending on the sewage treatment plant, that it's just not good enough — the DNR could come back and say it's not enough. My greatest hope is we can bring more retail and more business into the city of Fulton and we can continue to serve people and they won't have to go to other communities to get what they need.

City attorney: Robert R. Sterner

Sterner has served as Callaway County assistant prosecuting attorney, prosecuting attorney and associate circuit judge. He was appointed Fulton city attorney in 2015 to complete the term of Casey Clevenger when she resigned to accept an appointment as 13th Circuit drug court commissioner. He has more than three decades of prosecutorial experience.

Q.What do you think is the biggest issue the city needs to solve?
A. Fulton's municipal court appears to me to be operating fairly and efficiently, but I would invite anyone with a concern about it to share that with me at P.O. Box 130, Fulton.

Q. What makes you qualified for the position?
A. I have been responsible for the prosecution of thousands of cases. I rely on experience, more than 30 years, and my working relationship with the Fulton Police Department as I review every case submitted to me before deciding whether to file it.

Q. What is your greatest fear and what is your greatest hope?
A. My concern is fulfilling the primary responsibility of prosecution to see that justice is accomplished. As city attorney, my hope and goal is for justice to be achieved in each case and for the community to have confidence in the judicial process.