The ‘write’ stuff

Local writing group provides place to share

Denise Felt and Brian Warren discuss a fellow author’s work during a meeting of the Fulton Writer’s Group at Well Read Books. The group meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month.

Denise Felt and Brian Warren discuss a fellow author’s work during a meeting of the Fulton Writer’s Group at Well Read Books. The group meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month. Photo by Katherine Cummins.

Nov. 6 was the first Thursday of the month, and at Well Read Books that means a cozy circle of chairs drawn together after hours for a meeting of the Fulton Writers Group.

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Clarence Wolfshohl discusses a poem during a meeting of the Fulton Writers Group at Well Read Books Thursday. The group’s authors pen a variety of work, ranging from poetry and short stories to novels and non-fiction.

Although the gathering consisted of sharing current projects — readings included poems and two novels in progress — the conversation covered a whole range of topics.

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Leigh Rice scrolls through the latest chapter of the novel she is working on about a Marine suffering from PTSD during a meeting of the Well Read Writer's Group Thursday night.

A discussion regarding the foibles of various word processing software led to the comment “I might have to go back to my typewriter,” which spurred member Clarence Wolfshohl to share a story about how a typewriter is what finally got his granddaughter interested in fiction.

A reading of a poem from an absent member John DeBrodie led to a short discussion about the popularity of free verse and how modern poetry has little use for sing-songy rhymes.

“The best poets operating today use slant rhyme and near-rhyme,” Wolfshohl said. “The music of the words themselves is what makes up for it.”

Between readings and commentary on one another’s work, the group also managed to squeeze in discussions of the merits of Harry Potter, Twilight and romance novels.

With two former educators and an aspiring teacher in the group, there also were suggestions on how to make the classics — including Shakespeare — more relatable to today’s young readers.

It is that mixture of camraderie and advice on everything from writing to teaching that members said make the Fulton Writing Group a valuable resource.

“Writers need feedback and encouragement,” new member Denise Felt said.

A poet and writer of science fiction and fan fiction short stories, Felt described writing as a compulsion she’s had all her life.

“I’ve never been able to stop — I love words,” she said.

Bonnie Cruickshank, who writes primarily children’s books but currently is working on a romance novel, said she also started with the writers’ group because of “the chance of getting feedback from other writers and getting feedback from other people.”

She said writing for her is a way to share thoughts and emotions and an opportunity to “make that world in your head — you can go anywhere in the world you want.”

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