Fulton educator a finalist for presidential award

Science teacher Robertson noted for ability to engage students in active learning

Fulton High School science teacher Carol Robertson is one of four state finalists for the 2013 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching. Robertson has taught in the Fulton district since 1984.

Fulton High School science teacher Carol Robertson is one of four state finalists for the 2013 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching. Robertson has taught in the Fulton district since 1984. Photo by Katherine Cummins.

Fulton High School science teacher Carol Robertson has been named one of four state finalists in her subject area for the 2013 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.

Fulton Public Schools Superintendent Jacque Cowherd said he hopes the judges — a panel of eight scientists, mathematicians and educators — see what Robertson’s colleagues and students already know.

“We’re extremely proud she has reached this level. I hope the judges think she’s the best science teacher in the state. We know she is,” Cowherd said.

Extensive experience

Robertson has been with the district since 1984 — with a short breaks in 1984 and from 1989-1992, during which she stayed home with her sons. She is a previous chair of the high school science department and has taught chemistry, biology and genetics in addition to coaching volleyball for several years. She is a previous winner of Fulton Public Schools’ Teacher of the Year and Outstanding Service in Education honors, and in 2010 received the Outstanding Biology Teacher Award for Missouri from the National Association of Biology Teachers. Since 2007, Robertson also has served as an adjunct professor with Central Methodist University and taught dual enrollment courses at FHS.

While pursuing her master’s degree at the University of Missouri — from which she also received her bachelor’s degree in 1982 — Robertson was named Missouri’s first fellow with the Partnership for Research and Education in Plants, which enabled her to provide her Fulton students the opportunity to participate in genuine research.

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